With only four ingredients, what a dessert to melt in your mouth. If you are from South you will be familiar with this sweet. Normally both Palgova and Thiratipal are considered as same. But they are not. They are different. Palgova is prepared by boiling the milk and the end product is soft and smooth like halwa consistency. Whereas the process of preparing thriratipal is different. Every time when the mother visits her newly married daughter house she used to bring this for her son in law. The bridegroom’s parents are welcomed by the bride’s side with this sweet, when they arrive to the marriage hall. It is a special sweet in our custom.

Though store bought ones are available nothing can beat home made version where you have control over the ingredients and taste. The best result will be achieved only from the fresh cow’s milk. I never tried  with packet milk.

Though looks like simple, it is a tedious process. No one can deny it. I have given the steps to get a clear picture of the consistency during the process. Hope it helps you. The good milk will yield 1/8th thiratipal. I mean if you keep 8 cups of milk, you must get 1 cup of thiratipal. It differs according to the quality.



Thiratipal

Recipe: Thiratipal
Recipe Level: Medium
Recipe/Post by: Viji



Take the milk required to prepare this sweet.

Start boiling the milk in a stainless steel vessel with thick bottom.


After one hour the milk would have got reduced to 50%.



Keep stirring in between to avoid burning at the bottom which will spoil the whole milk. Start adding curd in batches – 1 tsp at a time – at regular intervals.


If you add at a stretch milk will get curdled fast and won’t give the desired result. It must be added slowly at regular intervals.


At one stage the fat will be separated and the thriatipal will be at pouring consistency.


Since it will be solidified while cooling. Remove and transfer it to the bowl and let it cool.


After one hour if you see the consistency -  it will be thick.





Ingredients:

Fresh cow’s milk 2 lr
Curd 3 tbsp (Yes!)
Brown sugar 1 cup
Elaichi powder ½ tsp

The beauty of this dish is the thread consistency – we call in Tamil – thri thriya . To get this normally people add citric acid. But I prefer to add fresh curd for slow curdling. Sometimes due to the milk nature, it curdles without adding citric/curd.

Keep the milk in a Uruli. I kept my uruli in India (which is 5 kg weight). Hence I have stainless steel vessel with thick bottom for my daily use. Start boiling. After one hour the milk would have got reduced to 50%. To avoid over flowing I used to put a small cup at the bottom. Keep stirring in between to avoid burning at the bottom which will spoil the whole milk. Start adding curd in batches – 1 tsp at a time – at regular intervals. If you add at a stretch milk will get curdled fast and won’t give the desired result. It must be added slowly at regular intervals. I added all the 3 tbsp. 

Normally it takes 90 minutes to 120 minutes for 2 litres approximately. When you reach the final stage – approximately 75 minutes, add the sugar with elaichi powder. Adding jaggery gives unique taste to this dish which I never tried. So I used brown sugar. Plain sugar will also do.

Now again the sweet will be thinned. Keep stirring. At one stage the fat will be separated and the thiriatipal will be at pouring consistency. Don’t over do. Since it will be solidified while cooling. Remove and transfer it to the bowl and let it cool.

Scoop and enjoy this sweet. After one hour if you see the consistency -  it will be thick. So if you over do, it will be like powder. If you are using good milk no need to add ghee. I never used ghee in preparation. Hope you like our traditional sweet.


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14 comments

  1. srividhya Ravikumar // 11 August 2010 at 09:20  

    wow..what a beautiful thiratipal...drooling colour... fabulous..

  2. Priya (Yallapantula) Mitharwal // 11 August 2010 at 09:42  

    I do know "kalakand" or "palkova", but never heard it byu this name. It is new, but as you said, it looks like palkova and wonderful step by step pics. I have tried it just once at home and it came well :)

  3. sanjeeta kk // 11 August 2010 at 11:45  

    Learned the same from my MIL. Lovely clicks and good presentation Srivalli.

  4. Sum // 11 August 2010 at 12:07  

    Havent heard of this at all! Looks good....

  5. Hari Chandana // 11 August 2010 at 13:52  

    Wowwwwwwwwww.. looks very delicious and awesome.. thanks for the lovely recipe :)

  6. Shanthi // 11 August 2010 at 19:08  

    Wonderful presentation

  7. Swathi // 12 August 2010 at 06:23  

    Looks delicious, I know it is difficult. But worth effort.

  8. Pelicano // 12 August 2010 at 08:56  

    I've never seen this delectable-looking sweet before, but it does remind me of kalakhand. You did a very nice job reducing milk- lots of patience!

  9. Rachana // 12 August 2010 at 16:38  

    This looks too yummy!!!! Beautiful step by step pics!

  10. PriyaVaasu // 12 August 2010 at 21:05  

    Thiratipaal Staple Sweet in every Tamil Brahmin's Marriage!!!As u rightly said The Groom is welcomed by Bride's Mom with a Bowl of Thiratipaal!!!! Yummy Sweet!!! Great Clicks!!!!

  11. Vcuisine // 13 August 2010 at 17:11  

    Thanks for all your comments. Looks like there are many fans like me to this traditional sweet! Glad to hear this. Update me with your result when you try sometime. Viji (Vcuisine)

  12. Vetrimagal // 17 August 2010 at 14:06  

    Well detailed. Inspires me to make it and see right now. But the word "brown sugar" got me a little puzzled.

    It is jaggery right?

    Thanks.

  13. Vcuisine // 17 August 2010 at 17:20  

    Hi, brown sugar is not jaggery. It is a kind of sugar in brown which is healthier than the white polished sugar. But pure cane sugar is better than brown sugar. If you are not confident, you can use the plain sugar. Update me. Thanks for visiting. Viji

  14. meeso // 22 August 2010 at 00:33  

    I remember a friends mom making this and I thought it was delicious!