Garam masala,Indian spice mix,sunshinemom,spices,Indian,North Indian


As you walk past the industrial estate from Kanjur Marg Station towards L.B.S. Road in Mumbai your senses will be accosted with the heady and aromatic odours of different Indian spices. This industrial estate is full of small scale industries that manufacture various ground masalas such as red chilli powder(lal mirch), turmeric powder(haldi), coriander-cumin powder(dhanajeera) and of course the most common of them all - the garam masala or Indian spice mix. Sadly, during the evenings, on your way back to the station, the same place is filled with the stench of stale, overused and burnt oil used for roasting the spices.

This is of course not true for all spice factories but one year of traveling down this path ensured that I would never again buy readymade spice mixes off the shelf. Turmeric and red chilli powder are comparatively safer to buy as they do not involve roasting in oil but it is always hygienic and preferable to pound your own masalas at home. It does not involve much work as generally assumed. You can do it very easily playing with available ingredients. Besides this, making your own mixture gives you the flexibility to increase your favourite spice and decrease or totally avoid the one that displeases you. It is better to make your own especially if you have a member prone to allergies caused by spices. For instance, black pepper is known to cause allergies in few people and is an inherent part of garam masala. You can make your own by omitting this if needed.

Garam masala, formed from Hindi words 'garam' (hot) and 'masala' (paste), refers to a basic and aromatic blend of ground spices common in North Indian and other South Asian cuisines. It is used alone or in combination with other seasonings to flavour many dishes (curries, dry vegetables, breads etc.). (Credit: Wikipedia) We, at beyond curries endeavour to bring to our readers the best of the basic as well as exotic Indian recipes. Masala in an Indian kitchen varies from home to home and has been adapted along the way to suit different palates. Mine is comparatively milder than the store bought 'garam masala' and also contains more cardamom and cinnamon than the general ratio. This is because cardamom and cinnamon both have exotic aromas and I like to heighten their flavours.


Recipe: Naram 'Garam Masala' (Indian Spice Mix - Mild version)
Prep Time: 15 mins (Excluding cooling time which should take approximately 15 minutes)
Serves:Almost a cupful.
Recipe Level: Easy/Beginner
Recipe modified from Kamal Mehta's version in Special vegetarian delights
Recipe/Post by: Sunshinemom

Ingredients:
1/2 cup or 30g coriander seeds (saboot dhania)
1" stick or cinnamon (dalchini)
10-12 nos. or 3g green cardamoms (chotti elaichi)
4 cloves
1 tsp. or 2g cumin seeds (jeera)
1 generous pinch of nutmeg (jaiphal)
2 blades of mace (javitri)

Special Utensils:
Heavy bottomed pan for roasting
Spice blender or small mixer to pound
Garam masala,Indian spice mix,sunshinemom,spices,Indian,North Indian


Method:

  1. Pick, clean and dry roast the coriander seeds and set aside to cool.
  2. Pound with the rest of the ingredients, sieve and bottle.
  3. Save the sieved masala and finish it by grinding with tomatoes or onions when making curry.

Note:
Do not peel the cardamoms. The skin itself is aromatic and any leftovers can be got rid off while sifting.


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Coconut is something so versatile that can blend its taste to whatever it is added. Its also something very basic that you can have handy all the time. Many curries and Stir fries gets a level elevated by adding a dash of this grated coconut.

Having ground coconut paste helps us get the kormas ready in a jiffy. You can also have the grated coconut stored in freezer. Another handy ingredients that could help you whip up quick breakfasts are the Rice sevais or noodles. When you have time, you can also make the sevais at home, but since you get good quality sevais ready made, I really don't' think we got to spend so much time making these from scratch.

So getting these two together works out like magic. I am sure every kid love the sevais with grated coconut and sugar. While it may be a hit with kids, I am sure they don't' mind this savory version too. Fixing a Coconut Sevai is very fast. If you have all the things ready on hand, all you have to do is to assemble them in a hot sizzling pan and you have your Sevai nicely flavoured with Coconut. There is nothing like working out a quick meal. Since I mostly have grated coconut readily stored. So this took about 10 mins to get done.

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Thenga Sevai ~ Coconut Rice Noodles


Recipe: Thenga Sevai ~(Coconut Rice Noodles)
Prep Time: 5 mins
Cooking Time: 10 mins
Serves: 2 people
Shelf Life: Serve it immediately after cooking
Recipe Level: Basic/Beginner/Easy
Spice Level: Can be adjusted according to taste
Recipe/Post by: Srivalli

Ingredients:
1/2 cup Rice Sevai
1/2 cup Grated Coconut
Salt to taste

For Tempering:
1-2 teaspoons Oil
1/2 teaspoon Mustard
1/2 teaspoon Urad Dal
1 teaspoon Channa Dal
5- 6 whole cashew nuts
Few curry leaves
2 -3 Green Chili, slit lengthwise

Procedure:
  1. Cook Sevai in about 3 times of water. Once its well cooked, drain them in a colander and keep it aside. This takes about 5 mins.
  2. For the seasoning heat a pan with oil. Temper with Mustard and Urad dal. Then add the slit chillies, curry leaves. Add salt and mix well. Then add the grated coconut and fry for another 2 mins. Then finally add the cooked Sevai.
  3. Simmer for 2 mins and let it get mixed well.

Your delicious Coconut Sevai is well ready within minutes.


Special Notes/Tips:
  • The cooked sevai should be allowed to cool a bit and not be overcooked since it has to be mixed well.
  • Optionally you can use peanuts along with cashewnuts for seasoning.
  • Even pre cooked sevais can be used.


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As the name clearly suggests, it's upma made with idli. This is the perfect way to clean up leftover idlis. What do you do with the idlis lying in the fridge from the previous night's dinner and is rock solid in the morning? Easy, it transforms into this delicious upma for breakfast. It's morphed so well that it tastes better than the actual idlis. There are so many ways to prepare this upma. You can simply dice the idlis into small pieces, do some tempering and fry the idlis. Add some vegetables to it or prepare a tomato-onion gravy and mix the pieces of idli to it and even more. The following method is my grandmother's version of preparing idli upma with few changes by me.

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Idli Upma


Recipe: Idli Upma
Prep Time: 5 mins
Cooking Time: 5 mins
Serves: 2-3 people (I used 6 Idlis)
Shelf Life: Serve it immediately after cooking
Recipe Source: My grandmother
Recipe Level: Basic/Beginner/Easy
Spice Level: Can be adjusted according to taste
Recipe/Post by: Madhuram

Ingredients:
Idlis - 6
Salt to taste

For Tempering:
2 teaspoons Oil
1/2 teaspoon Mustard
1 teaspoon Channa Dal
1 teaspoon Toor Dal
1/4 cup Raw Peanuts
Few curry leaves
1 Medium size Onion, finely chopped
1 Green Chili, slit lengthwise
1 teaspoon grated Ginger
A pinch of Hing
A pinch Turmeric Powder

Procedure:
1. Cut each idli into 5-6 pieces. Put it in a mixie (I use a food processor because it gives better results) and pulse it a couple of times until the idli pieces resemble a coarse powder like texture.
2. Meanwhile heat a frying pan with oil. Once the oil is hot add the ingredients listed in the same order one by one and fry it.
3. To this add the powdered idli and mix it thoroughly a couple of times. Check for salt. I also add 1-2 teaspoons of idli milagai podi (gun powder) at the end and combine it well. Serve hot and side dish is not required.


Special Notes/Tips:
  • It is not recommended to prepare this upma with fresh idli. If you do so, the idli will not powder but will become paste like. If you still want to prepare it very soon after preparing the idlis, put the idlis in the freezer for at least 15 minutes and then try powdering it in the mixie. I have actually tried this and it works.


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My family sitting in a Restaurant:

Hubby pondering over vegetable gravies, me eying Chinese...

Hubby: "Lets order Paneer in some gravy."
Me: "But we had it last time, and before that, and before that too."
Hubby: "Ok! lets order some Mixed vegetable kadai."
Me: "Nopes, it tastes sweet."
Hubby: "Or some soyabean masala?"
Me: "But the gravy is similar to Butter paneer."
Hubby: "Ok, got it! you want Chinese, right?"
I am about to shout "yes," but curb my excitement, since the waiter is already there to take the order.
Our son(whose presence was mostly neglected till now)... "Uncle, kindly bring A Masala dosa, a Sada dosa and Medu wada plate."
Me: Growling (forgetting that the restaurant guy is still around).. "Why do you want dosas and medu wadas at every restaurant we visit? Don't we eat same at least twice a week at home?"
Our son: "Oh yes, but then dosas at home are not this crisp and Medu wadas are oily or not crisp."
Me: Wondering whether to get angry at his blunt, brutally honest remark or be proud of him, that he, like his mother, has a good sense of food and taste, not to forget the texture too!

Well now that the truth was out, it was time to take action and scrutinize the method I followed till date, to know the mistakes I make, and to learn finally, how to make at home, crispier dosas, fluffier Idlis, and crispy medu wadas.

Mission one and two were easy breezy since I learnt how to make fluffier Idlis from here and here, and crispier dosas from here. The next target obviously were, some crunchy from outside, fluffy and chewy from inside, medu wadas, not to forget the shape(previously my wadas resembled maps of different countries of the world).

After lots of googling and reading , learning the do's and don'ts of making this famous South Indian snack, I came away with better looking crispier ones.

Kindly excuse me, for daring to venture into A South Indian zone, despite some great South Indian Bloggers in our Beyond Curries team. Thanks dear Team, for encouraging me to post this.


Medu wada,Medu vada,mendu wada,Savory doughnuts,Urad dal,fritters,Tiffin

Medu Wada


Recipe Medu Wada ( Doughnut shaped Urad Dal fritters)
Prep Time:
4-6 hours for soaking Dal,and 20 minutes for washing and grinding
Cooking Time:
20 minutes
Makes:
12-14 Wadas depending upon size
Serves:
4-5 people
Shelf Life:
The batter should not be ideally stored, since re-making the wadas after freezing will make render it oily or the refrigerated batter may turn watery, thus making it difficult to shape them properly. The wadas could be half fried and stored for 1-2 days
Recipe Level:
Easy or Medium
Spice Level:
Low
Recipe/Post by: Alka


Ingredients:
Urad dal(white) 2 cups
Green chillies 2-3
Salt as per taste
Coconut(few small chunks of it..optional)
Some Curry leaves
Very little Water for grinding

Special Utensils:
A sturdy grinder for grinding dal
A polythene bag,or ziplock bag(explained below)


Idli chutney,idli,medu wada,coconut chutney,south indain breakfasts,Tiffin
Idli, Medu Wada & Coconut Chutney

Procedure:

  1. Pick, rinse and soak urad dal for about 4-6 hours. You can soak it overnight if you intend to make these for breakfast.
  2. Change the water (you may need to rinse it again ) and drain in colander to get rid of excess water.
  3. Now keep few things ready....Firstly chop into fine chunks some coconut, chop some curry leaves, a large bowl filled with water, oil for frying in a frying pan, a polythene/ziplock pouch or empty milk bags(like those of Amul/Mahananda). Just cut open one such bag, and clean it thoroughly.
  4. Get back to dal, grind it till smooth, but do not add water liberally. Just sprinkle few drops of water and start grinding. If needed keep sprinkling few drops over dal again and again, to facilitate grinding. Remember that the batter should be thick and not of pouring consistency. Add ginger, green chillies, few black pepper corns(optional) and salt while grinding the dal.
  5. Transfer the batter into a large bowl/container and add chopped coconut and curry leaves. Mix properly in one direction to incorporate some air. This helps in getting fluffier wadas.
  6. Heat oil, place the cut opened polythene bag over some flat surface, and spread few drops of water over it to develop a very thin film of water.
  7. Now take about approximately 1 tablespoon of batter with your wet fingers and gently tap it on surface of polythene bag , which was GREASED with water.
  8. Gently make a hole in center, forming a doughnut shape and carefully pick the polythene sheet in your left hand(or right, if you are lefty), wet the fingers of your right hand , transfer the doughnut shaped wada on wet fingers, gently shake them over hot oil, taking care that few tiny drops of water might trickle down from your hand and cause spluttering. Once the wada lands successfully in oil, reduce the flame.
  9. You can fry the wadas one at a time, by repeating the same process, or if you are comfortable , fry few at a time in a single batch.
  10. Fry these over medium flame till crispy golden brown.
  11. Drain out the excess oil by placing these on kitchen towel.
  12. Enjoy hot crispy wadas with Sambhar or coconut chutney.


Special Notes/Tips:

  • The batter should be thick, so use water sparingly while grinding.
  • If the batter turns bit thin, add 1-2 spoons of rice flour, mix properly and carry on with frying.
  • If that is one bad day for you, and batter is still runny, even after adding rice flour, then simply forget circular doughnut shape, spoon blobs of the batter in hot oil as done while frying fritters(bhajji, pakora). Fry them on medium flame till yellow in colour, remove from oil, let these cool a bit, poke a hole in center with thumb/finger and double fry again. A not so good version of medu wada..agreed, but better than discarding the batter .
  • Traditionally a medu wada is fried by simply taking some batter on wet finger tips, and directly sliding it in hot oil. But not everyone can be good in this art, atleast for first few sessions of making Medu wada. Hence, using the polythene sheets/banana leaves to shape the wadas, give you more confidence initially.
  • The picture shows some Idli and Medu wada with coconut chutney. The recipe of Idli is given here , while that of chutney will soon follow.


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Gunpowder,Molagapodi,South Indian
Molagapodi

I am sure many of you are already familiar with molagapodi. I would place it at No.2 on a scale of 1 to 10 of favourite South Indian items next only to idli or dosai! Molagapodi or gunpowder as it is aptly monickered, is a heady mix of pulses and chillies spiced up for flavour and taste. The proportion of spices, omission or inclusion of certain spices, varies from region to region. My mother prepares it with the addition of tamarind and jaggery (just a little bit) to give it a tangy twist. She makes several bottles of molagapodi every year around the time we visit so that we have enough to carry back with us. The batch I am showcasing above was made in June. It is August now and the flavour is still as strong!

Not only does gunpowder serve as an accompaniment to idli and dosai but it will find its way into your buttered slices of bread, into your tortillas and rotis and also in your chaas and rice! I know this for sure because many friends of mine carry it with them when they go abroad and sprinkle it all over the food when the maitre d'hotel isn't looking, to give the food an Indian flavour. Are you ready for the recipe? Fine, you better get ready for some sneezing fit and keep a napkin handy just in case! The roasting red chillies might start a sneezing fit and I wouldn't want to be blamed for not warning you beforehand!


Recipe: Molagapodi OR Spicy Gunpowder
Prep Time: 45 minutes
Yield: 9 level cups
Shelf Life: 6 months to an year. Tastes best for 3-4 months. It has a longer shelf life but the flavour reduces with time.
Recipe Level:Easy
Recipe/Post by: Sunshinemom
Ingredients:
Bengal gram / Chana dal - 2 cups
Split dehusked black gram / Urad dal - 2 cups
Black sesame seeds / Kala til - 1 cup heaped (100g)
Dry desicated coconut / Copra - 1.25cups
Curry leaves /Kadi patta - 20 (3-4 sprigs)
Red chillies - About 30 (250g)
(We used byadgi/bedgi variety. It imparts a reddish colour and is less pungent)
Tamarind - 1 lemon sized ball
Jaggery (use the saltless ones) - powdered - 1.5tbsp.
Salt - 3 tsp.
Asafoetida / Hing - 2tsp.

Special Utensils:
A hanky/napkin to combat fits of sneezing while the chillies are roasting
A heavy bottom wok
Mixer
A sterilised bottle or jar

Gunpowder,Molagapodi,South Indian


Idli with Molagapodi

Procedure:
  1. Heat a heavy pan or wok. Roast dals and dry copra till pink (a few brown spots do not matter), each separately, without oil.Since the time taken for roasting is different for each ingredient, roast separately.
  2. The tamarind, curry leaves, salt and asafoetida should also be roasted to get rid of any moisture that may be present. If not, the shelf life of the final product will decrease and it is likely to get spoilt. These may be roasted together till the asafoetida starts releasing a characteristic smell.
  3. Cool the roasted ingredients to room temperature. Powder in batches to a coarse texture (please see the granular texture in the picture).
  4. After the ingredients are used up in batches, place the entire quantity in a large bowl and using a dry ladle, mix well to blend the flavours.
  5. Store in clean, airtight bottles.
  6. If your powder turns out a little pale in colour or brighter it is perfectly fine as the colour depends on the variety of chilli powder used.
  7. Molagapodi is served in small quantities (teaspoons) mixed with sesame oil. The oil needed is very less, just enough to bring the powder together but most people like to use the oil in excess.

Serving suggestions:
Molagapodi like I have mentioned above can be used as an accompaniment to idli, dosai, upma kozhakottai or even breads and rotis.


Special Notes/Tips:
  • Omit singly or together tamarind, jaggery and dry coconut as per your taste.
  • Increase the quantity of jaggery if you would like a sweet bite by 1/2tbsp. or the quantiy of tamarind by 1tbsp. if you would like it tangier.
  • Roast a bunch of coriander leaves and powder it along with the other spices but this will reduce the shelf life of the molagapodi.
  • If making in bulk store the larger portion in an airtight bottle/jar and transfer some into a smaller bottle for daily use. Replenish as and when needed. This will help in retaining the freshness of the stored powder.


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Today’s recipe is inspired from Nupur’s One Hot Stove and its Sago or Sabudana Kichidi. A very popular fasting food from Maharashtra, this Sabudana Kichidi is not only simple to make but is also lip smacking good. Soaked and fluffy Sago pearls are seasoned with nutty ground nut powder, sugar and salt and tempered with cumin seeds, aromatic curry leaves and spicy green chillies. The addition of peanuts turns this fasting food into feasting delight!

sago-kichidi2
Sago/Sabudana Kichidi


Recipe: Sago/Sabudana Kichidi (Medley of Sago Pearls with Ground Peanuts and Spice Tempering)
Prep Time: 5 mins (Excluding soaking time)
Cooking Time: 10 mins
Serves: 2-3 People
Recipe Source: One Hot Stove
Recipe Level: Easy/Beginner
Recipe/Post by: Sia

Ingredients:
1 cup Sago Pearls, rinsed and soaked in water overnight (8-10 hrs)
¾ cups Groundnuts/Peanuts, roasted, peeled and coarsely ground
2 tbsp Sugar
1 large Potato, cooked, peeled and diced into bite size pieces
Salt to taste

For Tempering:
1 tbsp Ghee + 1 tbsp Oil (or 2 tbsp Ghee)
1 tsp Jeera/Cumin Seeds
4-5 Green Chillies, slit (adjust acc to taste)
Few Curry Leaves (Optional)

Special Utensils:
Heavy bottomed pan


sago-kichidi1Sago/Sabudana Kichidi


Method:
  1. Rinse and soak sago pearls in enough water (just to cover sago) overnight. This way you will end up with fluffy and hydrated sago pearls.
  2. Gently mix in roughly ground peanuts, sugar and salt to taste to hydrated sago pearls and keep it aside.
  3. Now heat oil in a pan and add jeera and curry leaves if using. When jeera starts to sizzle add slit green chillies and diced potatoes and sauté for few mins till potatoes turn light golden.
  4. Mix in seasoned sago and stir gently for about 5-7 mins. Adjust the seasoning and cover and cook for another couple of minute.
  5. Serve this Sabudana Kichidi hot garnished with finely chopped coriander leaves and enjoy.


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This versatile SIMP or South Indian Masala (Spice) Powder is very handy to prepare gravies, rice, curries, chutneys in jiffy. The blend of fresh spices fried to golden brown in oil makes it convenient for quick cooking. Tamarind adds sour taste to the dishes. Those who don’t prefer tamarind can add amchur (dry mango) powder. Adding salt will enhance the shelf life. I will be using this powder in my coming recipes. Feel free to change the ingredients quantity as per your taste. No hard rules.

This SIMP powder is handy for making the following dishes.
  • Variety rice with vegetables of your choice.
  • Dry roast curries
  • Sambars and kootus (lentil based gravies from South India)
  • Chutneys (dips)
  • Puli Aval (tamarind poha/beaten rice)
  • Stuffed vegetable curries
  • For kotsus (a type of stew for tiffins)

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Recipe: South Indian Masala Powder (SIMP)
Preparation Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 30 minutes
Grinding Time: 15 minutes (in batches)
Quantity: One 500 gms bottle full
Shelf Life: Upto 1 Month when kept in fridge
Recipe Level: Basic/Beginner
Recipe/Post by: Viji

Ingredients:
1 cup Gram/Channa Dal/Split Chickpeas
1 cup Urad Dal/Split & Skinned Black Lentils
½ cup Sesame Seeds
½ cup Coriander Seeds
½ cup Desiccated Coconut
15 Red Chillis
3 pea sized Hing/Asafetida (in paste form)or 1-2 tsp Hing Powder
2 tbsp Black Pepper
2 tbsp Jeera/Cumin Seeds
1 tsp Fenugreek/Methi Seeds
1 lemon size Tamarind Pulp
1 tsp Haldi/Turmeric Powder
Few Curry Leaves
2 tbsp roasted Groundnuts/Dalia/Whole Channa
8 Cashews Nuts
1-2 tbsp Sesame Oil
Little Salt

Special Utensils:

Skillet
Mixer

Photobucket

Preparation:
  1. Fry all the ingredients, except turmeric powder and salt, separately in oil at medium to low heat till theu turn light golden brown and aromatic. Add coconut and cumin seeds at the end and roast them till they turn light golden in colour.
  2. Keep these roasted ingredients aside on clean and dry plate and let them cool completely.
  3. Transfer all these roasted ingredients into a mixer jar and grind them to coarse powder.
  4. Mix in turmeric powder and salt and mix them well.
  5. Tansfer ground powder into clean and dry air tight container.

Special Notes/Tips:
  • Tamarind can be cut into small pieces and fried or microwaved before grinding.
  • Adding tamarind or amchur powder (dry mango powder) will save us from adding lemon juice for dry dishes.
  • Always add cumin/jeera at the end when all other ingredients are hot.
  • The nuts give crunchy taste and will thicken gravies to some extent.


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Snacks and Savories of any kind makes it a great treat to kids and elders alike! These simple Sev or Bhujias are no less. It might appear tough but believe me, making these are quite simple. And the ingredients are mostly available readily in any pantry! Whats more toddlers find these very appealing when sent for their school mid day snacks. So instead of sending them store bought, with little time and energy, we have quick and home made snacks handy! These are what I mostly make for my kids and they disappear in no time! I always remembered my Amma making these and though I used to press them down, I used to think it was tough. But after venturing into this, realized what a easy job it turned out to be! So remove your fear and enjoy!


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Plain Bhujias, Spinach Bhujias

Recipe: Plain Bhujias (Plain Deep fried Snacks with Gram Flour)
Prep Time: 15 mins
Cooking Time: 10 - 15 mins
Makes: 3 cups
Shelf Life: Stays crispy for a week when stored in Air tight
Recipe Level: Medium/Intermediary
Recipe/Post by:Srivalli
Ingredients:
1 cup Besan / Gram Flour
Turmeric a pinch
Salt to taste
Asafetida a pinch
Soda a pinch
Water as required
Hot Oil - 2 tsp
Oil for deep frying

Special Utensils:
Muruku Achuchu

Photobucket
Plain Bhujias

Procedure:
  1. In bowl, take all the ingredients and mix well. Then add little water to get a thick batter. When you try to drop the batter, it shouldn't actually drop down easily. Place this batter inside the Murukku achu.
  2. Heat a pan with oil. Once its really hot to be dropped, test with a small ball. Then press down in a circle so that it doesn't stick to each other.
  3. Simmer the flame to low and cook on both sides. Once its cooked in both sides, remove to a kitchen towel.
Align Centre

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Palak or Spinach Bhujias



Recipe: Palak Bhujias (Deep fried Snacks with Gram Flour & Spinach)
Prep Time: 15 mins
Cooking Time: 10 - 15 mins
Makes: abt 3 cups
Shelf Life: Stays crispy for a week when stored in Air tight
Recipe Level: Medium/Intermediary
Recipe/Post by: Srivalli
Ingredients:
1 cup Besan / Gram flour
Salt to taste
2 tsp Hot Oil
Asafetida a pinch
Soda a pinch
1 bunch Spinach / Palak
1 Green Chillies (increase for more spice)
2" Ginger

Special Utensils:
Muruku Achuchu

Procedure:
  1. Take Palak, green chillies and garlic and grind to a smooth paste using 1/4 cup of water. Strain the liquid.
  2. In a bowl, take all the other ingredients and mix well. Then make a thick batter using the palak water.
  3. Place this batter inside the murukku achu and press this into Sev once the oil is hot.
  4. Remove to a kitchen towel and enjoy with a cup of Coffee or Tea.

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Plain bhujis and Spinach Bhujis with the Sev press!

Special Notes/Tips:
  • While making the paste from the greens, ensure not to add too much of water.
  • The batter should be thick else it will absorb more oil.
  • Have the oil hot, then simmer and press thd batter directly but take care as oil might spill out.


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